Is Your Website Google Friendly?

Here at JAM we are always looking to new technology and ways to get your website ranked higher in google searches.

Google has recently announced that they will be penalizing you for having intrusive pop-ups on your website. This can be problematic on mobile devices where screens are often smaller. To improve the mobile search experience, after January 10, 2017, pages where content is not easily accessible to a user on the transition from the mobile search results may not rank as highly.

Here are some examples of techniques that make content less accessible to a user:

  • Showing a popup that covers the main content, either immediately after the user navigates to a page from the search results, or while they are looking through the page.
  • Displaying a standalone interstitial that the user has to dismiss before accessing the main content.
  • Using a layout where the above-the-fold portion of the page appears similar to a standalone interstitial, but the original content has been inlined underneath the fold.

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4 Reasons Why a Website is Important for your Business – Week 4

Without class enrollment, or selling more than you spend, your business is doomed. By having an online presence you allow for the registration and payment of your classes or services around the clock to whoever whenever with no or hardly any limitations; Unless you run out of room in a class or out of something in the pro-shop, but thats a good problem to have right! Giving your business the online presence it deserves is crucial to your brand and accountants smile.

In short, being visible worldwide means you are very likely to gain more customers. The more customers and visitors you have, the more sales you will generate. The more sales you generate the happier you and your shareholders will be!

4 Reasons Why a Website is Important for your Business – Week 3

What is more convenient: driving outside to look for different stores that are available to shop in, or sitting in the comfort of your own home and shopping for the products you’re looking for? Pretty obvious answer, unless you like aimlessly driving around. Smart businesses realise this and thus have their own website housing their products and services so that potential customers can browse online for the products they want to purchase.



4 Reasons Why a Website is Important for your Business – Week 2

Accessible around the clock
Your website and social media accounts are accessible 24/7/365. Imagine that you want to buy from a store. You put in all the effort required to go to the store, but when you get there, it’s closed. We all know how irate we feel in that situation. You’ll think twice about going back given the bad taste its left (ok might have been your fault for not checking but hey, this is proving the point here!). You will just find another store that is more easily accessible.

Since your website is operational around the clock, from the convenience of the local coffee shop, their couch or their bed, your customers and clients can easily access your website and services.


4 Reasons Why a Website is Important for your Business – Week 1

Cost Effective
You know exactly how much your website is going to cost you and its on goings – a brick and mortar store on the other hand is susceptible to many out of the ordinary occurrences which could blow out the costs such as leaving the lights on, theft, damage, extra staff etc.

A strategically developed website and online presence solution provides tremendous benefits and costing outlines.


Coaches Helping Athletes Past Their Fears

Great blog post from the Positive Coaching Alliance!


This resource stems from a question submitted to the Ask PCA blog. Responses come from our experts including PCA Trainers, who lead live group workshops for coaches, parents, administrators and student-athletes.

“How can coaches help athletes past their fears after a mishap, such as a beaning in baseball, being thrown by a horse or falling from a gymnastics apparatus?”

PCA Response By Al Adamsen, PCA Trainer – San Francisco Bay Area
Fear — being scared of something or someone — is extreme stress. While athletes may use stress productively, fear is often debilitating, especially for a young person. Fear creates noise in the mind — negative self-talk, for example — which often inhibits, if not paralyzes, performance. Therefore, coaches must use techniques to help young athletes move past fear to a mindset that’s positive, present, and productive.

Some say that removing fear requires athletes to experience the particular situation or occurrence over and over again, creating familiarity and the chance to remove the fear. But in the case of helping a baseball player past a beaning, for example, this would mean throwing fastballs into a kid’s shoulder until he gets used to it, which is not OK. It’s as absurd as someone repeatedly falling off a horse intentionally, or falling off a gym apparatus intentionally.

But you can simulate scenarios and instruct kids on what to do in situations where the accident threatens to re-occur. You can teach them how to turn away from an inside pitch to avoid or reduce its impact. You can teach riders and gymnasts to fall more safely. All these are advisable.

Download a printable version of this resource, including any additional commentary from PCA, by clicking the PDF below. To read more questions and answers like this, or to submit your own question to the Ask PCA blog, click here.

California passes law to make Cheerleading official sport in high schools

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Gov. Jerry Brown has approved legislation to make competitive cheerleading an official high school sport in California.

The governor on Wednesday announced signing a bill requiring the California Interscholastic Federation to oversee competitive cheerleading as it does other high school sports.

Democratic Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez of San Diego says at least eight other states treat competitive cheerleading as a sport. She says the formal recognition will give the sport the respect and safety standards that athletes deserve.

Her bill, AB949, requires the change by the 2017-18 school year.

Gonzalez is a former high school and college cheerleader.

The Democratic governor previously signed a bill by Gonzalez requiring minimum wage pay and overtime for cheerleaders of professional sports teams.


6 Cheer Training Corners You Shouldn’t Cut

I saw this awesome post over at OmniCheer & just knew I had to share with you all!

When it comes to cheer training, there are some corners you just shouldn’t cut. Here are six traps to avoid if you want to reach your full cheer potential:

    1. Spending less time on your weaknesses. Michael Jordan once said that if someone points out a weakness to him, he is going to work hard on that perceived weakness until it becomes a strength. That’s the kind of attitude a successful athlete needs. Don’t avoid things you don’t like or aren’t as good at. Work at them until you get them down, and chances are you’ll start to enjoy doing them once they aren’t a source of frustration for you. This might mean you need to work on it outside of practice, ask for extra help, or research how to do a certain skill in our University.
    1. Neglecting your strengths. Just because you are working hard on your weaknesses doesn’t mean you can stop practicing your strengths. They became your strengths for a reason, after all. Neglecting them can cause you to backtrack, plus you don’t want to miss a chance to make them even better. For example, just because you have your splits and needle doesn’t mean you should stop working on your flexibility. Use success as encouragement to keep going, not a reason to stop.
    1. Cutting lines. If your team runs lines for conditioning, don’t turn around inches from the line. Go all the way! If you’re running laps around the gym, even if it’s just for a warmup, don’t cut the corners. Do the full thing. We’ve all heard the saying, “You’re only cheating yourself,” but that’s not entirely true. Cheerleading is a team sport, so you are also cheating your teammates. You don’t want to set that kind of example for your teammates to follow, and you don’t want to give your team less than your full potential. Cheerleading is tough. Don’t cut corners on these easy things like doing the whole workout. Cheerleaders cannot afford to be lazy.
    1. Stopping before you’re done. This applies to conditioning and skill work. Don’t jog those last few steps or go easy on that last pushup. Go strong through the very end. That’s when you can really get the benefit from the workout. Boxing legend Muhammad Ali said that he didn’t even start counting his reps until he got tired since that’s when it really started to count. Plus, someone on a rival team could be doing a similar workout right now. Don’t be the one slacking off!
    1. Skipping practice. Just don’t do it. Sickness happens, of course, but depending on the severity, you might be able to come watch practice still. This shows your teammates and coaches how dedicated you are, and ensures your transition back to the squad will go as smoothly as possible. The same thing goes for injuries. Your teammates know you could be at home watching TV while you ice your ankle, but the fact that you are doing it there at practice with them shows what kind of teammate—and athlete—you really are.
  1. Avoiding strength work. Some cheerleaders love to spend extra time on their own working on their fitness level, while others dread even doing the minimum amount of strength and conditioning work at practice. You can’t force yourself to enjoy something that you just don’t like, but don’t give up on fitness work altogether. There are plenty of ways to get and stay in shape—you just have to find the one that you enjoy.

What other corners do you see cheerleaders commonly cut that could be holding them back?

Snap 1.3 Enhancements

Hope you’re having a great week.  Just wanted to let you know about a few improvements that went out today…
Edit Price Models
After much anticipation, the ability to edit price models is now available!  Just visit a price model & click the ‘Edit’ button at the bottom of the screen.  Two major things of note here.  First, you cannot change the ‘Enrollment Duration’ field.  Simply put, it would cause too much mayhem changing from a ‘Multiple days’ to a ‘Single day’ model, or vice versa!  The second item of note for editing price models is that it DOES NOT change any existing invoices.  It will, of course, be reflected both in the app’s projection of their next billing cycle as well as any new invoicing.
Clone Classes
Yep, now you can clone existing classes & put them in the same or a new folder directory.  That’s going to make adding more classes & teams a breeze.  The only caveat to mention w/ this feature is it ONLY clones class info.  It DOES NOT clone enrollments, waiting lists, & staff as there are simply too many date oddities & usability choices that prolong the use & development of this feature.
Transferring an Individual Enrollment
Now when those parents call in explaining that Suzie’s got to switch from Mon to Tue, no problem!  Just visit that user’s account, select the enrollment & choose ’Transfer’.  You can schedule an end date on the existing enrollment & build a new one all from 1 screen!
Class Roster Report
See each of your students, their parents & contact information grouped by all or any classes of your choosing.
In addition to these major improvements, we finished some bug fixes (including that pesky login email address edit bug) & stylistic changes that will improve your experience in the app!
As always, thank you so much for your feedback.

5 Tips for Gymnastics Parents from Nastia Liukin

Reblogged from all

Nastia Liukin, a 5-time gold medalist. She is the 2008 Olympic individual all-around champion, the 2005 and 2007 world champion on the balance beam, and the 2005 world champion on the uneven bars. She is also a four-time all-around U.S. national champion, winning twice as a junior and twice as a senior.

Nastia has also been known for her commitment in helping young girls with big dreams. She believes that parents play an important role in the lives of their young Olympic hopefuls. Now, in this post, Nastia Liukin has some tips/advice for parents of a gymnast. Having experienced it herself, she clearly remembers how her parents helped to shape her path.

So, here are the list of 5 tips from our Olympic medalist:

5 Tips for Gymnastics Parents from Nastia Liukin.